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Social Networking In The 1600s Essay Writing

You’ve been assigned a social networking essay, and it sounds really great, because you’ve finally gotten an assignment that at least somehow touches your real life, and not some abstract concepts found in books. So, you sit down and start writing, but soon after you find out that your essay looks like a blog post rather than an academic paper. What can you do about it?

First of all, we want to remind you that, regardless of the topic, most essays still are supposed to maintain academic tone, so you can’t just write it as a story you will send to your friend or post at your blog. Secondly, you need a clearly defined thesis statement and a set of arguments to back it up. Are you already terrified and hate your social networking essay assignment? Don’t worry, we know how to help you.

First of all, you can use the sample provided below to get a better idea of how such papers should be written. Use it as a template to understand the structure of an essay and the usage of arguments. Secondly, we have a lot of useful advice on writing and motivation at our blog – don’t forget to check it out, too!

What Makes Social Networks Addictive?

A contemporary world can boast many technical, and intellectual achievements, without mentioning a huge human potential, but our society was completely overwhelmed when the first created social networks started its invasion. And, in the 21st century, they made us literally dependent. So, what makes them so habit-forming?

Firstly, this addiction lays in the social networks’ variety. There are dating, and common interest websites, online encyclopedias, and friend social networks, where we can communicate. For example, “Today, more than 500 million users are active participants in the Facebook community alone and studies suggest that between 55% and 82% of teenagers and young adults use SNSs (Social Network Sites) on a regular basis” (Kuss & Griffith 68). Secondly, such networks are like an own virtual world. We can stay private there, or we can paint our story in bright colors. But by receiving a particular feedback there we may aggravate our self-esteem, and enhance our diffidence. Not to mention the fact that we can acquire a habit of a pathological lying. “Most adolescents (78%) always or predominantly received positive feedback on their profiles” (Schouten 101). Thirdly, its addiction is the desire to find a friend. A lonely or socially rejected person just wants to find the same people in order to create a so-called shelter. A place, where they can keep it real, find support, and not feel neglected.

Ultimately, we can deal with this social network addiction with the help of our positive and careless attitude toward such online instruments. These networks are just some kind of challenge which we have to overcome and learn to enjoy the benefits of civilization.

Works Cited

Kuss, Daria J., and Mark D. Griffith. “Excessive Online Social Networking: Can Adolescents Become Addicted to Facebook?”. Education and Health Journal, vol. 29, no. 4, 2011, pp. 68-71. Sheu, www.sheu.org.uk/sites/sheu.org.uk/files/imagepicker/1/eh294mg.pdf. Web.

Schouten, Alexander Peter. “Adolescents’ Online Self-disclosure and Self-presentation.” Diss. The Amsterdam School of Communications Research ASCoR, 2007. Adolescents’ Online Self-disclosure and Self-presentation. Print Partners Ipskamp, Enschede. CiteSeerX, www.citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.121.6295&rep=rep1&type=pdf. Web.

The distractions of social media, 1673 style

Update June 2013: I wrote an Op-Ed on this topic for the New York Times, which draws modern lessons from the 17th-century concerns about the distractions of coffeehouses.

Here’s an extract from my forthcoming book (to be published in October 2013) on the prehistory of social media, from the Roman period to the present day. (A previous extract, about Martin Luther and social media, is here.) You know how you can easily lose track of time while checking Twitter and Facebook? And how people worry that social media is distracting people from doing real work (aka “social notworking”)? The same thing happened in the 17th century with coffeehouses, a new social-media platform where people went to read and discuss the news:

With the promise of a constant and unpredictable stream of news, messages and gossip, coffeehouses offered an exciting and novel platform for sharing information. So seductive was this new social environment — you never knew what you might learn on your next visit, or who you might meet — that coffeehouse denizens found themselves whiling away hours in reading and discussion, oblivious to the passage of time. “Thence to the coffeehouse” appears frequently in the celebrated diary of Samuel Pepys, an English public official. His entry for January 11th, 1664 gives a flavour of the cosmopolitan, serendipitous atmosphere that prevailed within the coffeehouses of the period, where matters both trivial and profound were discussed:

Thence to the Coffee-house, whither comes Sir W. Petty and Captain Grant, and we fell in talke (besides a young gentleman, I suppose a merchant, his name Mr Hill, that has travelled and I perceive is a master in most sorts of musique and other things) of musique; the universal character; art of memory… and other most excellent discourses to my great content, having not been in so good company a great while, and had I time I should covet the acquaintance of that Mr Hill… The general talke of the towne still is of Collonell Turner, about the robbery; who, it is thought, will be hanged.

Enthusiasm for coffeehouses was not universal, however, and some observers regarded them as a worrying development. They grumbled that Christians had taken to a Muslim drink instead of traditional English beer, and fretted that the livelihoods of tavern-keepers might be threatened. But most of all they lamented that coffeehouses were distracting people who ought to be doing useful work, rather than networking and sharing trivia with their acquaintances.

When coffee became popular in Oxford and the coffeehouses selling it began to multiply, the university authorities objected, fearing that coffeehouses were promoting idleness and diverting students from their studies. Anthony Wood, an Oxford antiquarian, was among those who denounced the enthusiasm for the new drink. “Why doth solid and serious learning decline, and few or none follow it now in the university?” he asked. “Answer: Because of coffee-houses, where they spend all their time.” Similar concerns were voiced in Cambridge, where one observer noted that

it is become a custom after chapel to repair to one or other of the coffee houses (for there are divers), where hours are spent in talking, and less profitable reading of newspapers, of which swarms are continually supplied from London. And the scholars are so greedy after news (which is none of their business) that they neglect all for it, and it is become very rare for any of them to go directly to his chamber after prayers without first doing his suit at the coffee-house, which is a vast loss of time grown out of a pure novelty. For who can apply close to a subject with his head full of the din of a coffee-house?

Inevitably, the opposition to coffeehouses found expression in pamphlet form. The author of “The Grand Concern of England Explained” (1673) grumbled that coffeehouses had

done great mischiefs to the nation, and undone many of the King’s subjects: for they, being great enemies to diligence and industry, have been the ruin of many serious and hopeful young gentlemen and tradesmen, who, before frequenting these places, were diligent students or shopkeepers, extraordinary husbands of their time as well as money; but since these houses have been set up, under pretence of good husbandry, to avoid spending above one penny or two-pence at a time, have gone to these coffee-houses; where, meeting friends, they have sat talking three or four hours; after which, a fresh acquaintance appearing, and so one after another all day long, hath begotten fresh discourse, so that frequently they have staid five or six hours together in one of them; all which time their studies or shops have been neglected.

The coffeehouse bore, the know-it-all political commentator and the businessman spreading false rumours are all stock figures in the satire of the period. Another pamphlet, “The character of a coffee-house” (1673) mocks the coffeehouse as “an exchange, where haberdashers of political small-wares meet, and mutually abuse each other, and the publick, with bottomless stories, and headless notions; the rendezvous of idle pamphlets, and persons more idly employed to read them… The room stinks of tobacco worse than hell of brimstone, and is as full of smoke as their heads that frequent it.”

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